Unlock the Masterpieces of Euan Uglow

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Euan Uglow (1932-2000) was an English figurative painter and printmaker, renowned for his precise technique and commitment to portraying the human figure. He favoured a traditional approach to painting, focusing on the human form in a range of poses and environments and often from an unusual, often uncomfortable, point of view. His paintings are often described as being both tender and sensual.

Uglow was born in London and studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, where he was taught by William Coldstream and Claude Rogers. His time at the Slade was influential for Uglow, exposing him to the ideas of European art, particularly the works of the French Post-Impressionists. After graduating in 1956, Uglow moved to Cornwall where he lived until his death.

Uglow’s painting style was characterized by its precision and a focus on the human figure. He often depicted people in everyday poses or activities, such as sitting, standing or walking. His figures were often shown in a range of environments, including interiors and landscapes. Uglow’s paintings were not intended to be narrative, but instead were meditations on the human form.

Uglow’s works are often described as tender and sensual. He was an advocate of the nude and he often chose to depict his figures in a variety of positions to reveal their physicality. Uglow’s works often feature a combination of geometric shapes, created through the positioning of his figures, and a range of muted tones.

Uglow was also a prolific printmaker and produced a wide range of etchings, lithographs and woodcuts. He often used his prints to explore his ideas about the human form and many of his prints feature the same figures that appear in his paintings.

Uglow’s work was widely exhibited in the UK and abroad. He was included in group shows at the Royal Academy, the Hayward Gallery and the Tate Gallery. He had solo shows in both London and New York and his work is held in many prominent public collections, including the British Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Uglow’s commitment to portraying the human form, combined with his precise technique, has firmly established him as one of the leading British figurative painters of the 20th century.