Dean Cornwell: Legendary Illustrator and Painter of the Golden Age of American Illustration

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Dean Cornwell (1892-1960) was a prominent American illustrator and muralist who forged a successful career in the early 20th century. He is widely recognized for his stunning portraits, advertising illustrations and murals depicting historical and allegorical figures. Cornwell was born in Payson, Utah in 1892 and grew up in California, where he studied at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design.

He was greatly influenced by the Art Nouveau movement and began to experiment with the style in his early works. In the 1920s, he moved to New York City and quickly rose to fame as one of the leading illustrators in the United States. He became known for his masterful use of light and shadow and his ability to capture the essence of his subjects. Cornwell was highly sought after for his illustrations, which were used in advertising campaigns and featured in numerous magazines.

He was also a popular portrait painter, creating stunning works of art for prominent people of the day, including President Calvin Coolidge and actress Mary Pickford. In addition to his illustrations, Cornwell was a highly accomplished muralist. He was commissioned to create murals in many prominent locations, including the Los Angeles Public Library, the Pasadena Playhouse, the Chrysler Building in New York City, and the Los Angeles County Courthouse.

His murals often featured allegorical figures, such as justice, motherhood, and brotherhood, which were meant to inspire and educate viewers. Cornwell's work has had a lasting legacy, and he is widely considered to be one of the most important illustrators and muralists of the 20th century. His works are highly sought after by collectors and can be found in many notable art galleries and museums around the world.